Comparing the charge of the light brigade and falling leaves

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. The charge was made by the Light Brigade of the British cavalry, which consisted of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons17th Lancersand the 8th and 11th Hussarsunder the command of Major General James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan.

Comparing the charge of the light brigade and falling leaves

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. The charge was made by the Light Brigade of the British cavalry, which consisted of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons17th Lancersand the 8th and 11th Hussarsunder the command of Major General James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan.

The two brigades were the only British cavalry force at the battle.

Comparing the charge of the light brigade and falling leaves

The Light Brigade were the British light cavalry force. It mounted light, fast horses which were unarmoured. The men were armed with lances and sabres. Optimized for maximum mobility and speed, they were intended for reconnaissance and skirmishing.

They were also ideal for cutting down infantry and artillery units as they attempted to retreat. It mounted large, heavy chargers. The men were equipped with metal helmets and armed with cavalry swords for close combat. They were intended as the primary British shock forceleading frontal charges in order to break enemy lines.

Comparing the charge of the light brigade and falling leaves

Cardigan and Lucan were brothers-in-law who disliked each other intensely. Lucan received an order from the army commander Lord Raglan stating: Troop horse artillery may accompany.

French cavalry is on your left. This was an optimum task for the Light Brigade, as their superior speed would ensure the Russians would be forced to either quickly abandon the cumbersome guns or be cut down en masse while they attempted to flee with them.

Raglan could see what was happening from his high vantage point on the west side of the valley. However, the lie of the land around Lucan and the cavalry prevented him from seeing the Russians' efforts to remove the guns from the redoubts and retreat.

Nolan carried the further oral instruction that the cavalry was to attack immediately. In response to the order, Lucan instructed Cardigan to lead his command of about troopers [4] of the Light Brigade straight into the valley between the Fedyukhin Heights and the Causeway Heights.

The opposing Russian forces were commanded by Pavel Liprandi and included approximately 20 battalions of infantry supported by over 50 artillery pieces. These forces were deployed on both sides and at the opposite end of the valley. Lucan himself was to follow with the Heavy Brigade. Although the Heavy Brigade was better armoured and intended for frontal assaults on infantry positions, neither force was remotely equipped for a frontal assault on a fully dug-in and alerted artillery battery—much less one with an excellent line of sight over a mile in length and supported on two sides by artillery batteries providing enfilading fire from elevated ground.

The semi-suicidal nature of this charge was surely evident to the troopers of the Light Brigade, but if there were any objection to the orders, it was not recorded.

The Charge of the Light Brigade It may be that he realised that the charge was aimed at the wrong target and was attempting to stop or turn the brigade, but he was killed by an artillery shell and the cavalry continued on its course. Captain Godfrey Morgan was close by and saw what happened: The first shell burst in the air about yards in front of us.

The next one dropped in front of Nolan's horse and exploded on touching the ground. He uttered a wild yell as his horse turned round, and, with his arms extended, the reins dropped on the animal's neck, he trotted towards us, but in a few yards dropped dead off his horse.

I do not imagine that anybody except those in the front line of the 17th Lancers saw what had happened.Comparison Between ‘The charge of the Light Brigade’ and ‘the Falling Leaves.

A similarity between the poems ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’ and ‘the falling leaves’ is how they both focus all attention on the destructiveness and horror of war. O the wild charge they made! All the world wonder’d. Honour the charge they made!

Honour the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred! Summary. The poem tells the story of a brigade consisting of soldiers who rode on horseback into the “valley of death” for half a league (about one and a half miles). Nov 01,  · Sample GCSE English Literature poetry essay.

Posted on November 1, by Emma Lee. I like to compare Futility with The Fallen Leaves or next to of course god america i but it didn’t fit. for example, The Charge of the Light Brigade which has a very regular, rhythm to it – more jingoistic, more like a hymn or a rhyme or.

e.g. ‘Compare how war is shown in The Charge of the Light Brigade and one other poem from ‘Conflict’. You will have a choice of two questions, each with a.

Home > GCSE > English Literature > Poems to compare with. Poems to compare with Futility. Themes: the effects of conflict, sadness and loss, helplessness; Compare this poem to: sadness and loss- 'The falling leaves', 'Come on, Come back' Effects of confict- 'Poppies' Helplessness- 'Belfast Confetti' The Charge of the Light Brigade.

Themes. Compare how conflict is presented in The Charge of the Light Brigade and one other poem. 3. Bayonet Charge Ted Hughes The Falling Leaves Margaret Postgate Cole ‘Come on, come back’ Stevie Smith Leaves are glued to the pavement with frost.

Sample GCSE English Literature poetry essay | Teaching English