The breaking point of the human spirit

This is a very good thread and it is important to consider the psychology of demoralization. Some food for thought which may be familar to most of you from George Orwell: By making him suffer.

The breaking point of the human spirit

In writing Nature, Emerson drew upon material from his journals, sermons, and lectures. A new edition also published by Munroe, with Emerson paying the printing costs, his usual arrangement with Munroe appeared in December of This second edition was printed from the plates of the collection Nature; Addresses, and Lectures, published by Munroe in September The second edition of this collection was published in Boston in by Phillips, Sampson, under the title Miscellanies; Embracing Nature, Addresses, and Lectures.

Nature was published in London in in Nature, An Essay. And Lectures on the Times, by H. A German edition was issued in Emerson prefaced the prose text of the first edition of Nature with a passage from the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. The second edition included instead a poem by Emerson himself.

Both present themes that are developed in the essay. The passage from Plotinus suggests the primacy of spirit and of human understanding over nature.

The Breaking of the Human Spirit, page 1

Emerson's poem emphasizes the unity of all manifestations of nature, nature's symbolism, and the perpetual development of all of nature's forms toward the highest expression as embodied in man.

Nature is divided into an introduction and eight chapters. In the Introduction, Emerson laments the current tendency to accept the knowledge and traditions of the past instead of experiencing God and nature directly, in the present.

He asserts that all our questions about the order of the universe — about the relationships between God, man, and nature — may be answered by our experience of life and by the world around us. Each individual is a manifestation of creation and as such holds the key to unlocking the mysteries of the universe.

Nature, too, is both an expression of the divine and a means of understanding it.

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The goal of science is to provide a theory of nature, but man has not yet attained a truth broad enough to comprehend all of nature's forms and phenomena. Emerson identifies nature and spirit as the components of the universe.

He defines nature the "NOT ME" as everything separate from the inner individual — nature, art, other men, our own bodies. In common usage, nature refers to the material world unchanged by man.

Art is nature in combination with the will of man. Emerson explains that he will use the word "nature" in both its common and its philosophical meanings in the essay.

At the beginning of Chapter I, Emerson describes true solitude as going out into nature and leaving behind all preoccupying activities as well as society.

When a man gazes at the stars, he becomes aware of his own separateness from the material world. The stars were made to allow him to perceive the "perpetual presence of the sublime. They never lose their power to move us. We retain our original sense of wonder even when viewing familiar aspects of nature anew.

Emerson discusses the poetical approach to nature — the perception of the encompassing whole made up of many individual components. Our delight in the landscape, which is made up of many particular forms, provides an example of this integrated vision. Unlike children, most adults have lost the ability to see the world in this way.

In order to experience awe in the presence of nature, we need to approach it with a balance between our inner and our outer senses. Nature so approached is a part of man, and even when bleak and stormy is capable of elevating his mood.

All aspects of nature correspond to some state of mind. Nature offers perpetual youth and joy, and counteracts whatever misfortune befalls an individual.

The visionary man may lose himself in it, may become a receptive "transparent eyeball" through which the "Universal Being" transmits itself into his consciousness and makes him sense his oneness with God.

The breaking point of the human spirit

In nature, which is also a part of God, man finds qualities parallel to his own. There is a special relationship, a sympathy, between man and nature. But by itself, nature does not provide the pleasure that comes of perceiving this relationship.In marriage, when relationships break down, the tendency is to walk away and find someone new rather than work at reconciliation.

The world is full of people with broken hearts, broken spirits and broken relationships. “The Lord is close to the broken-hearted and saves those who . And surfers are territorial, they stick to certain breaks. If we can get some hair samples, and get a match to a certain beach, we'd know which break the Ex-Presidents surf.

You buyin' this? Pappas: No. But let's do it anyway; it'll drive Harp crazy. Oct 06,  · Do you think the human will and spirit has a breaking point? Do you think it's possible for a human being to have an iron, unbreakable will and spirit?

For example, do you think some individual have the ability to take extreme amounts of mental, psychological and emotional abuse, and not be bothered?Status: Resolved. How ever many times we might fall, the human spirit gives us the strength to get back up and try again.

Inevitably, persistence begets progress. One day, despite all odds, we accomplish what we set out to create. Human spirit is the ability to face the uncertainty of the future with curiosity and optimism. It is the belief that problems can be solved, differences resolved.

It is a type of . In human psychology, the breaking point is a moment of stress in which a person breaks down or a situation becomes critical. [1] The intensity of environmental stress necessary to bring this about varies from individual to individual.

What is the human spirit?